My Books

Easter: McEaster Valley

“I was drawn to the valley as if it had something to offer and if I didn’t respond, I would never have another opportunity.”

– Walter R. Hoge, DVM, and author of McEaster Valley.

Thoughts on My Thoughts

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

“The book is intended to increase the understanding of how intricate and fine-tuned nature is and the experiences I went through, which helped me desire to become a veterinarian. Also, things that sidestepped my progress along the way.”

– Walter R. Hoge, DVM, and author of Thoughts on My Thoughts

Peek inside the book

Thoughts on My Thoughts II

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

It is a common theme in many books and films: when people get lost in a desert or a jungle and try
to walk in a “straight line”, they end up walking in circles.

– Walter R. Hoge, DVM, and author of Thoughts on My Thoughts

Peek inside the book

Thoughts on My Thoughts III

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

If scientists have found parallel universes, we may one day have the opportunity to skip from one time period to another and have experiences only imagined.

– Walter R. Hoge, DVM, and author of Thoughts on My Thoughts

Peek inside the book

Book Reviews

Easter: McEaster Valley

Thoughts on My Thoughts

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

Thoughts on My Thoughts II

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

Thoughts on My Thoughts III

The TALES That Wagged This Veterinarian

Easter: McEaster Valley

“Dreams and aspirations in our lives are often the
catalysts that lead to great accomplishments that
benefit the world in which we live.”
– Walter R. Hoge, DVM, and author of McEaster Valley.

This unique and earthy tale is reminiscent to William P. Young’s The Shack, in that it was written to the authors’ children and that it serves as a parable that there is more to life than glitter and gold and that sometimes, the places where we get lost are exactly where we need to be. What distinguishes Hoge’s fable is that it excites the imagination and conjures wonderment in the natural world in all its simple complexities.

Whatever it is Hoge found in McEaster Valley, he shares with his readers this: If we respect the community in which we live, take care of our planet, and learn more about its nature, it may well yield clues that will help us live healthier, happier lives.

Available at

Thoughts on My Thoughts

The Tales That Wagged This Veterinarian

In 1952 Stanley L. Miller carried out the Miller-Urey experiment which showed that complex organic molecules could be synthesized from inorganic compounds. This discovery gave a huge boost to the scientific investigation of the origin of life. Indeed, for some time it seemed like creation of life in a test tube was within reach of experimental science. This “God like” discovery had a strong influence on the atmosphere in science classes I attended in the 60’s.
 
We have come a long way since Stanley Miller’s experiment creating organic building blocks that make up the temporal bodies of the plant and animal kingdom. However, man has never created a living organism from basic matter that makes up the earth and given it the “spark of life” and the ability to regenerate itself. The only documented place I’ve found where a living organism has been created that could repro e plants and animals. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity of being able to touch some of God’s creations during my life time and can’t wait for the day when I may meet with Him and ask, “Just how did you do that?”

Available at

Thoughts on My Thoughts II

The Tales That Wagged This Veterinarian

It is a common theme in many books and films: when people get lost in a desert or a jungle and try
to walk in a “straight line”, they end up walking in circles. No matter how hard they try, at some point
they will cross their own tracks and despair, because they realize that they will never make it back to
civilization. Surprisingly enough, the belief that people walk in circles when lost is mainly based on
anecdotal evidence and has never been studied systematically in a real desert or forest.
Scientists have now presented the first empirical evidence that people can’t walk in a straight line and
really do walk in circles when they do not have reliable cues to their walking direction.
It turned out that these circles were rarely in a systematic direction. Instead, the same person sometimes
veered to the left, sometimes to the right. Walking in circles is therefore not caused by differences in leg
length or strength, but more likely the result of increasing uncertainty about where straight ahead is.
Thinking about walking in circles and trying to walk a straight line—even with all the volumes of
information we have accumulated about how life began we still find ourselves getting lost and turning
in circles trying to solve one of science’s greatest outstanding mysteries. Even the individual pathways in
metabolism are intricate. It is hard to imagine how such an intricate process could have started by itself.
Complicating things further, each step is controlled by a molecule called an enzyme, which speeds
up the chemical reactions in question. Enzymes are complicated molecules that can only be made
through metabolism, under the control of genes.

So, scientists face a biochemical chicken-or-the-egg dilemma: Which came first, the chemical engine
to build the cell, or the cellular mechanisms needed to build the engine?

In the quest for finding certainty in our pursuit for truth and understanding, it seems to me good
council to consider what is written in 1Kings 19:11012. The Lord is not found in the strong winds,
disasters, earthquakes or fire. After all is done, His answer will be found in “a still small voice.”

Available at

Available at

Thoughts on My Thoughts III

The Tales That Wagged This Veterinarian

If scientists have found parallel universes, we may one day have the opportunity to skip from one time period to another and have experiences only imagined. We might escape to another universe and then back to the present time. One might be able to be enlightened by spending a moment in Paradise.

There is no such thing as immaterial matter. All spirit is matter, but it is more fine or pure, and can be discerned by purer eyes; We cannot see it unless our bodies are purified. It is all matter. D&C 131:7-8.

Most those who experience an out of body experience (OBE) recognize that the light was love, and it was the only thing that meant anything in this universe. OBEs are suspected to have existed since the dawn of man. The painter Hieronymus Bosch of the Netherlands painted, Accent of the Blessed to the Heavenly Paradise, around 1490 which depicts man ascending into another world (universe?).

Available at

Available at